Abbey Delaney March 10, 2015

Approximately 9 in every 1,000 babies are born with a congenital heart defect (CDH) making heart defects the most common birth defect. That is just one reason why each year Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) hosts a gala to raise awareness and research money for this disease.  This long-standing event attracts more than 400 medical and community leaders and their families in the tri-state area. Proceeds fund innovative research by Columbia University physicians that benefits pediatric cardiology patients locally and around the world. During the 28th Annual Babies Heart Fund Gala, Dr. Anjali Chelliah, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at CUMC, was presented with the Babies Heart Fund (BHF) Faculty Research award.  Dr. Chelliah was honored for her groundbreaking and innovative work with 3D Printing.

Dr. Anjali Chelliah, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at CUMC, was presented with the Babies Heart Fund (BHF) Faculty Research award, which was 3D printed by Materialise.
Dr. Anjali Chelliah, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at CUMC, was presented with the Babies Heart Fund (BHF) Faculty Research award, which was 3D printed by Materialise. From left to right: Dr. Julie Vincent, Dr. Anjali Chelliah, Dr. Emile Bacha, and Todd Pietila.

Her work has supported cases like “Saving a Newborn with the Support of 3D Printing” where with the 3D-printed model in hand, the team of clinicians at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital found a way to treat this baby with complex congenital heart disease.  As a result, the team was able to repair all of the newborn’s defects during one procedure, instead of three or four surgeries.

To honor Dr. Chelliah, Materialise 3D printed the trophy awarded to her.  Starting with a CT scan of a patient’s heart and using the Mimics Innovation Suite software, a specialist at Materialise was able to segment the heart and create a 3D digital model.  This file was then exported to a 3D printer, where it was printed using the latest technology.  The vessel wall and muscle of the heart were printed in highly transparent material, while the blood was printed in red color.

 

“Working with Dr. Chelliah and the entire team at Columbia University Medical Center has been a great opportunity.  3D Printing has enabled them to treat the most complex of CHD patients and ensure the best outcomes possible,”

commented Todd Pietila, Business Development Manager, Materialise. Columbia University doctors are at the forefront of discovering new life-saving techniques for pediatric care and research. Now with the aid of 3D Printing, they are able to push the frontier even further.  And Materialise is proud to support them on their journey! 

Check out our website to learn more about our 3D printing service for biomedical engineering!

Newborn saved with 3D Printing

 

Heart trophy